Pleas to save Faculty Row ignored by UConn administration

The nine historic cottages built circa 1890-1930 known as Faculty Row on the University of Connecticut campus in Storrs are considered a treasure by many former students, officials, and faculty who have had fond memories of this revered complex. The sign placed at the entrance to this mini-campus enclave tells of its importance in the early history of the university. The present plan to demolish these Nationally Registered historic cottages is regrettable. Alternatively, an adaptive re-use of these buildings should be made a top priority by the administration, as they represent an invaluable component of the university’s historic fabric.

The time has come for a Connecticut college credit bank

In this budget-challenged environment, college students in Connecticut are being particularly stressed. State subsidies are being cut. Reliance on student loans is increasing. All the while, those of us in higher education spend too much effort “rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic.” It is time to find real solutions to systematic problems in higher education. We must revisit what we can — and what we should — do to support our students. And we must think big.

Connecticut must find an alternative to ever-rising college tuition

I am writing to express my concern regarding the recent finalization of Connecticut public college tuition rising 3.5 to 5 percent next year. Since 2008, college tuition has been steadily increasing. As a graduate student this year, I have been affected by tuition rises since day one of my education. My concern is for students like me struggling with debt and bad credit to start our lives and careers.

Regents, keep the Three Rivers civil engineering tech program

I am one of 80 students in the Three Rivers Community College’s civil engineering and environmental engineering technology programs who are urging the Board of Regents to save the civil engineering technology program. We want the Board of Regents to immediately delay its decision, now set for today, on terminating the program until the end of this summer to allow for a “cool down” period.

Ojakian on tuition hikes –What a difference a day makes

March 22, former Chief of Staff to Gov. Dannel Malloy and current Board of Regents President Mark E. Ojakian stated, “I have consistently said I am not going balance the state’s financial burden on the back of our students.” March 23, he is asking for a painful 5 percent increase in tuition costs for the 88,000 students in two and four year programs at State Universities and Community Colleges.

CSCU system spending should be more detailed and transparent

CSCU President Mark Ojakian has mentioned repeatedly that contract negotiations with unions in higher education are important because of a dire need to rein in spending within our system. I agree. However, before we once again attack the problem of “doing more with less” we have a responsibility to the taxpayers and students to clearly detail how we currently spend. As a system, we haven’t done this.

CT prof on CSCU’s Ojakian: Scorched earth, not warm feelings

The Mirror’s recent article on CSCU President Mark Ojakian portrayed him as a good listener, a mediator, a reasonable man, and a really nice guy. But the warm feelings engendered by the Mirror’s puff piece should not be allowed to obscure the fact that the contract proposals put forward by his Board of Regents are nothing short of a scorched-earth attack on the faculty of Connecticut’s four state universities and the students they serve.

What do Connecticut’s professors actually do?

People’s perception of the work that others do is often inaccurate. This is especially true for university professors. The public in general, and politicians in particular, and even our governing body, the Board of Regents, seem to believe the work that full-time professors do is easy and largely limited to the classroom. Is this perception accurate? Let’s look at what professors actually do.

GMO labeling case is not based on science

The movement to label foods containing genetically modified organisms is based on bad information and flies in the face of scientific reason. If state legislatures continue to pass bills that support the anti-science agenda, we will end up with a patchwork of unnecessary regulations that stand to negatively impact the food industry and ultimately hit consumers where it hurts most—in their wallets.