Let Hartford go bankrupt

Connecticut is in the midst of a financial crisis. The decisions made now will determine whether our state returns to its former glory days, or whether it continues on its present path of job contraction and depopulation as young people and retirees flee. The first step in bringing back Connecticut is to allow Hartford to go bankrupt. This will send a message to other big spending municipalities and the state itself that the party is over.

Sweeping Community Investment Act funds will do more harm than good

The state’s fiscal crisis is forcing the administration and the members of the General Assembly to make tough decisions in order to close the budget gap in the current fiscal year and craft a new biennial budget. That said, we strongly contend that sweeping dedicated funds, such as the Community Investment Act (CIA), into the state general fund will only do more harm than good by cutting off a consistent source of funding and reinvestment for our communities, while defeating the very purpose of having established a dedicated fund.

Save the Bottle Bill

The Bottle Bill is our most effective recycling program in the state, and after being around for 37 years, we’re pretty familiar with how it works. But the bottle industry is lobbying for us to dismantle it and replace it with curbside recycling programs and taxes, which would waste much of the value to be found in recycling.

Education funding: An investment in Connecticut’s future

The lawsuit decided last fall and currently in appeal, CCJEF v. Rell, confirmed what we already know about the way we fund public education in Connecticut: while we might spend enough to educate our state’s public school students, we do not share our funding equitably. The reality is that many of our highest need communities need more resources to support their students. This is too important to wait to address for another year.

East Windsor casino fails the Jimmy Kimmel test

The Jimmy Kimmel test is very simple: No family should be denied medical care, and any legislation that falls short of it fails this test. But this test can be applied to a third casino in Connecticut. It’s simple, really. All lawmakers have to do is ask their constituents: Do you want a casino in your town? Here’s how the conversation might go. …

Hartford teacher: I have no choice but to speak up

I look forward to a day when quality and equitable educational opportunities for all students is not just a vision, but a reality. Until that day comes, I know I have an obligation to use my voice as a classroom teacher to inform legislator’s decisions and help drive progress in the right direction.

Legal marijuana is coming to New England; Connecticut should benefit

Last week, House and Senate Democrats announced a budget proposal that, among other things, would tax and regulate marijuana. As a Hartford City Councilor, this was welcome news. Back in March, I submitted a resolution to support marijuana legalization as a way to generate revenue for our struggling cities that would not increase tax rates. But more importantly, marijuana legalization would create jobs and business opportunities for our youth, something Connecticut needs even more than revenue.

Natural gas infrastructure projects must get back on track

It would be a colossal mistake for Connecticut to permanently back away from its commitment to expand energy infrastructure, which would provide increased statewide access to clean, affordable natural gas and support thousands of good-paying jobs. Connecticut has suffered too long from the highest electricity costs in the nation. High energy costs not only hurt household budgets, but also hold back businesses and undermine job creation. Why would a business—especially an energy-intensive company—relocate or expand in Connecticut if the cost of energy isn’t competitive?

Lawmakers, leave the Johnson Amendment alone

The Connecticut Council for Philanthropy (CCP) is an association of grantmakers committed to promoting and supporting effective philanthropy for the public good. On behalf of the Board of CCP, we are writing to express our strong opposition to federal legislation that would repeal the Johnson Amendment, thereby politicizing the charitable nonprofit and philanthropic community by repealing or weakening current federal tax law protections that prohibit 501(c)(3) organizations from endorsing, opposing, or contributing to political candidates.

Natural gas infrastructure projects must get back on track

It would be a colossal mistake for Connecticut to permanently back away from its commitment to expand energy infrastructure, which would provide increased statewide access to clean, affordable natural gas and support thousands of good-paying jobs. Connecticut has suffered too long from the highest electricity costs in the nation. High energy costs not only hurt household budgets, but also hold back businesses and undermine job creation. Why would a business — especially an energy-intensive company — relocate or expand in Connecticut if the cost of energy isn’t competitive?

Connecticut residents shouldn’t have to subsidize Millstone’s bottom line

Dominion Energy – a company headquartered in Virginia – is asking Connecticut residents and businesses to pay more – through what is effectively a tax on your electric bill – to keep its Millstone nuclear plant afloat — even though it hasn’t produced any evidence that it needs the money. … We urge Connecticut’s legislators to consider the negative impact this legislation will have on the budgets of Connecticut residents and businesses. This is an avoidable disaster that will negatively impact our customers and our state for years to come.