The National Popular Vote is not an end run of the Constitution

Last Thursday, the Connecticut House of Representatives debated a bill, HB 5434, which would include Connecticut in the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. When this bill passes in enough states, the NPV Interstate Compact will change the way the American people elect the President of the United States. During the Connecticut House debate, an argument was made that the NPV Compact is an “end run around the Constitution.” This assertion is not true.

Give her and other Connecticut adoptees back their identities

My birth certificate is a legal lie.

What’s true on it is that I was born at 4:44 a.m. Oct. 27, 1967. It’s also true I was born in Norwalk Hospital. And I’m guessing that Eric G. Norrington, MD, who’s listed as the attending physician, really was there.

What’s not true are the names typed in all caps under “Full Name of the Child’s Mother and Father.”

Lessons of the abolitionists are important today

The organizing efforts of black and white abolitionists in the 1800s can provide us with powerful inspiration as we face the dangers of Trump and the Republican majority. That’s one reason on May 18 I will be joining the upcoming celebration of Frederick Douglass’s first visit to the capital city at the Center Church (First Church of Christ in Hartford).

Equitable pay for women worth billions to Connecticut

According to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, nationally, women earn about 80 cents for every dollar earned by men and this gap is even more pronounced for women of color – black women earn 63 cents and Hispanic women earn 54 cents as compared to white men. This economic injustice affects not only women, but every man and child who has a woman in their lives.

Require open carry gun folks to show their permits — without being asked

As open carry is legal in Connecticut, I cannot say it would be appropriate or reasonable to allow police to demand a permit of a person who is acting within the law. That being said, open carry is uncommon so, right or wrong, people may be concerned by the sight of a gun. I believe the only constitutionally acceptable remedy is to require permit holders to present their permit during any interaction with police.

Open carry pistol permit bill punishes the law-abiding

The General Assembly’s Judiciary Committee is considering H.B. 6200, a bill that would allow police officers to demand to see one’s pistol permit if they “observe” a pistol or revolver. The problem with this bill is that it targets only the law-abiding. The purpose of this bill is squarely to punish legal behavior — behavior that the advocates of this bill dislike.

Suzio, Linares bills on electoral vote put party above country

I am concerned about two bills proposed in the Connecticut General Assembly; SB 108 introduced by Sen. Len Suzio, 13th District, and SB 133, introduced by Sen. Art Linares, 33rd District. These bills would change how Connecticut awards its Electoral College votes to presidential candidates.

Democrats missed opportunity in passage of hate crime legislation

Division comes from a lack of transparency? This is where Danielle Morfi of North Haven should have started her comments on ‘partisan politics’ in Connecticut. With all her outrage aimed at Sen. Len Fasano, Morfi failed to see the true dangers of Connecticut’s one-party system. State Democrats missed an opportunity by unilaterally drafting and introducing legislation aimed at hate crimes.

The ‘open carry’ debate is about privacy, not guns

Granting police the power to ask to see open carry permits from gun owners may not violate the Second Amendment, but it might violate the Fourth Amendment, the right to privacy. You have the right to conduct business without agents of the government asking to see your papers.