Protect CT’s public lands with transparency. Vote yes on Question 2

Who benefits from Connecticut’s treasured public lands? Everyone. For many in our state, public lands like Hammonasset Beach, Heublein Tower, Gillette Castle, and Sleeping Giant, are the only resource to enjoy the outdoors and open space, making State Forests and Parks invaluable to our communities and the state as a whole. Public lands are here for everyone. That’s why most Connecticut State Parks and Forests are free, providing local places for relaxation, inspiration, and for kids to explore and learn about nature. On Nov. 6, you have the chance to vote yes on Question #2 to protect your state parks, forests, and other valuable public lands from being sold, swapped or given away without a public hearing. That will ensure public lands remain public and open for everyone.

Nagging questions about the future of Hartford’s South Meadows

Which is better for the residents of Hartford: a trash- to- energy plant or a 250 megawatt gas- fired power plant? City officials have voiced strong opposition to the current proposal to modernize the waste processing facility in Hartford’s South Meadows, arguing there are better uses for the site, and that the facility imposes significant health impacts on residents. The City Council impaneled a Solid Waste Task Force to consider alternatives for managing the city’s waste. While some council members have spoken of marinas or upscale riverfront condominiums, the area is suitable only for commercial/ industrial development.

More methane from Bizarro President

What do Americans want? Is it a good five-cent cigar or a chicken in every pot? More cowbell? Hard to say, but what we’re going to get, courtesy of our Bizarro President, is more methane. Whoopee, extra methane! Tell the children and grandchildren. You remember Bizarro Superman from DC Comics. He was the polar opposite of the Man of Steel. Superman was good; his breath was super cold; and his X-ray vision could see through anything but lead. Conversely, his Bizarro mirror image was bad —with hot breath and X-Ray vision that could only see through lead.
President Biazarro, in his administration’s fourth major rollback of environmental regulations this year, is making it easier for oil and gas drillers on federal and tribal land to let methane escape into the warming air we breath.

Connecticut should back this herring conservation plan

Regional fisheries managers are about to make a huge decision on Atlantic herring conservation that will reverberate across New England’s ocean and impact many species. You wouldn’t think such small fish could be such a big deal, but herring are a critical species, sustaining a huge range of wildlife, from marine mammals like humpback whales to sportfish like striped bass to birds like osprey. The New England Fisheries Management Council is set to vote on a new plan to manage herring at its meeting on September 25 in Plymouth, Mass., and the National Wildlife Federation supports strong action to conserve this important food source.

Does Monsanto’s Roundup cause cancer?

Does glyphosate, the active ingredient in the widely used weedkiller Roundup, cause non-Hodgkin lymphoma? This question is at issue now in a lawsuit in San Francisco Superior Court. Hundreds more claims have been cleared to proceed in a federal multi-district lawsuit. Much of this litigation is based on a 2015 determination by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, part of the World Health Organization, that glyphosate is a probable human carcinogen. This report has come under heavy criticism, which is not surprising because there’s a lot of money at stake.

Our energy supplies and sources should be designed with security in mind

As a user and advocate for renewable energy for more than 40 years, I have no problem with large scale wind power so long as it does not become the overarching source. The first responsibility of government is, or should be, the health, safety and security of its citizens. Unfortunately, our Department of Energy and Environmental Protection makes little to no attempt to look at energy security implications in any of its plans or assessments. DEEP appears to be under the impression that discussion of security is breach of security. Experts agree nothing could be further from the truth and if done correctly it can act as a deterrent.

These CRISPR-modified crops don’t count as GMOs

To feed the burgeoning human population, it is vital that the world figures out ways to boost food production. Increasing crop yields through conventional plant breeding is inefficient – the outcomes are unpredictable and it can take years to decades to create a new strain. On the other hand, powerful genetically modified plant technologies can quickly yield new plant varieties, but their adoption has been controversial. Many consumers and countries have rejected GMO foods even though extensive studies have proved they are safe to consume. But now a new genome editing technology known as CRISPR may offer a good alternative.

Time to curb transportation pollution

The cars, trucks, buses and trains that make up our transportation system are responsible for more pollution than any other sector. Tailpipe emissions of carbon dioxide are Connecticut’s largest contribution to global climate change, but our vehicle emissions are also directly responsible for problems in our communities. Pollution from transportation is a leading cause of asthma, strokes and heart attacks in the state, and our most vulnerable populations are being hit the hardest. It’s time we get serious about cleaning up Connecticut’s transportation system, and we don’t have to look far to find the solutions.

Connecticut needs a moratorium on crumb rubber

Health, the environment, and wildlife. These are only a few areas of life that the installation of crumb rubber (recycled tire rubber) on playgrounds and playing fields negatively affects. My goal in this letter is to effectively express the importance of establishing a moratorium on the use of recycled tire rubber (crumb rubber) at municipal and public school playgrounds.

Connecticut needs natural gas infrastructure upgrades

Connecticut needs more supplies of all kinds of affordable, reliable energy — and that means sensible, long overdue expansion of our natural gas supply infrastructure as well as investments in increased renewables as they make economic and operational sense for our power grid.

Let’s build a bridge to a reliable, efficient, affordable energy future

Connecticut has many assets that can help us grow our economy, create jobs, and address our serious fiscal challenges. But one significant competitive hurdle that must be overcome is our distinction as the most costly energy state in the country. New England has long been at an economic disadvantage for energy costs, largely due to the distance from where traditional energy fuels were harvested and processed. This meant we paid the costs associated with constructing and maintaining several thousands of miles of pipeline infrastructure and other costs associated with transporting fuels to our region.

Let’s teach our children about global warming

According to a new national study, Americans overwhelmingly support teaching our children about global warming – in all 50 states, including Connecticut – and including Republican and Democratic strongholds. Despite this strong public support for climate education, however, there have been recent debates in several state legislatures about whether to include climate change in K-12 science education.