Restore a common sense plan to Connecticut Juvenile Justice

The CTMirror story Juvenile Justice in CT: “What’s left after all the cuts” rings loudly in the ears of those of us working in the deep end of the system. The Connecticut Juvenile Training School, and the Walter G. Cady School educational component have been forced to operate with insufficient programming for the youth both within and outside the facility.

Building a foundation of hope for Connecticut

With the recent tragedies in Orlando, Louisiana, Minnesota and Dallas, this is a sad time for our nation and each and every one of its residents. It highlights in so many ways the worst of our instincts and policy failures –- lack of understanding, tolerance and acceptance as equals of the many groups that comprise this great nation; the ease with which weapons of war are obtained and used against both ordinary people and law enforcement officers; racial divisiveness, fear and fear-mongering promulgated by individuals, groups and mass media yearning for provocative messaging.

Thumbs down on the SEEC settlement with state Dems

The the State Elections Enforcement Commission (SEEC) settled a long-running, high-profile case involving the Connecticut Democratic Party (CDP). Although the terms of the settlement are commendable in many respects–including imposing the largest election law violation fine (excuse me, “voluntary payment”) in state history–the SEEC exercised poor judgment in deciding to settle the case. Rightly or wrongly, justly or unjustly, the settlement creates the appearance that a major political party in Connecticut can “buy” its way out of an embarrassing investigation by the chief regulator of our state campaign finance laws.

Time for adult responsibility at Connecticut Juvenile Training School

At the Connecticut Juvenile Training School (CJTS), workers compensation claims are soaring, mostly because staff is frequently injured putting youth in physical restraints. The Department of Children and Families and union officials told The Connecticut Mirror that restraints are necessary because youth at the facility are so difficult. They point to recent policies that removed many young people from CJTS, leaving only the most challenging youth at the facility. This reaction is disturbing on several levels and underlines the need to work toward closing CJTS.

Malloy campaign law settlement was a mockery and a sham

The recently settled case between the State Elections Enforcement Commission, the Democratic State Central Committee and the Dan Malloy for Governor campaign needs further disclosure. The DSCC and Malloy campaign made a sham of the Citizen’s Election Program . The settlement was made without allowing the SEEC the ability to conduct a reasonable investigation.

Connecticut’s sex-offender registry needs reform, too

Ironically, one of the arguments against recently proposed criminal justice reform makes a strong case for reform of Connecticut’s sex offender registry. A listing on the sex offender registry can be a life sentence. There is no distinction between a sociopathic serial offender and a teen who makes a one-time mistake. Further, we believe all low-risk individuals should never make it on the registry.

Better outcomes in CT juvenile justice — and potentially savings, too

With the state’s new fiscal reality as background, the Children’s League of Connecticut has offered a number of policy based solutions meant to improve the quality of life for youth and families served by the Connecticut juvenile justice system. In many cases these concepts will result in lower costs to taxpayers and in all cases we believe our suggestions will result in better outcomes for youth and their families — which should be everyone’s goal.

Legislative witnesses hold forth on how old a juvenile should be

After stalling out during the regular legislative season, Gov. Dannel Malloy’s proposal for a Second Chance Society is awaiting action by the General Assembly later this week. Among other things, the governor asked for the elimination of bail bonds for misdemeanor offenses and that 18- to 20-years be tried as juveniles — an idea that engendered both support and opposition. The governor has now dropped the age adjustment idea as a political compromise, but a long list of witnesses provided testimony both for and against the idea during a Judiciary Committee hearing earlier this year. Here are some excerpts from witnesses on the age issue and the bail legislation as well:

‘Privacy culture’ continues to stymie Connecticut democracy

What is it that we can’t find out lately in the land of the free, in this cradle of democracy we call Connecticut? Too much stays secret. Our collective memory of Ella Grasso is fading. You may remember she was the first woman in America elected governor of her state in her own right. She convinced a unanimous legislature – unanimous – of the value to democracy in having state Freedom of Information laws and of setting up the nation’s first FOI Commission. Now it’s not going so well.