Fairness to workers should come in many forms

The CT Working Families Party fully supports the Gov. Dannel Malloy’s call for a fairer Connecticut. We’re very encouraged by his commitment to put the needs of Connecticut’s workers, who have made so many sacrifices over the years, first. His plan to ensure fairness in the workplace is a welcomed return to the policies he campaigned on and made Connecticut a national leader for other states to follow.

State of the immigrant community far from ‘Connecticut Fairness’

In his annual State of the State address, Gov. Dannel Malloy paints a picture of a “fair Connecticut” that does not currently exist for immigrant youth. On the first day of the 2018 Legislative Session, … he noted that “Connecticut Fairness” means that Connecticut passed the Connecticut Dream Act to ensure equal access to higher education for immigrant students in our state.

Silent Cal, Noisy Donald and the business of America

In 1925, during another era of pronounced income inequality and less than five years before the Great Depression, President Calvin Coolidge addressed this existential question: What is America about? When taken out of context of its accompanying remarks, the bastardized version of his famous quote—“The business of America is business”— does not do our 30th president, or us, justice.

A transportation funding crisis years in the making

Fare hikes, rail service cuts and a freeze on transportation projects.  As he promised in December, Gov. Dannel Malloy announced them all last month.  Rail commuters and highway drivers are justifiably outraged, but they should direct their anger not at the Governor or Connecticut Department of Transportation but at the legislature.

Next steps for Connecticut’s fiscal stability and economic growth

Connecticut is poised for a serious debate over the size and role of its future government as it prepares for a new legislative session in February and a new business-led economic commission due to issue its report on March 1. How should the state view the options during this historic debate? Connecticut has assets most states can only dream about: an enviable location; a highly skilled workforce; world-renowned educational, medical and cultural institutions; a diversified economy; and an attractive quality of life. Yet, we are inundated with a bleak one-dimensional narrative of failure, job loss and stagnation.

Indifference, neutrality help the oppressors, not the oppressed

Indifference manifests itself in ignorance, silence and acceptance. Turning our backs to the injustices suffered by the marginalized, vulnerable, and victimized in our local communities and around the world is a weak and heartless admission that the status quo is just fine with us when it doesn’t affect our lives directly — at least not yet. And that’s a very big “yet” because unchecked turmoil can arrive anytime at our doorsteps regardless of who we think we are.

GOP candidates should get some legal advice on contracts

At last week’s Republican gubernatorial debate, the various candidates proudly proclaimed how they would each seek to unravel the state’s collectively bargained agreement with the state workforce. Several candidates said they would abolish pensions entirely. At least one candidate – a self-proclaimed “expert” in pension and retirement benefits – has said that he would, as governor, seek to “override” the agreement entirely. In other words, these candidates believe in ignoring the Constitution of the United States of America.

The state’s pension plans as configured are doomed to fail

States all over the country are grappling with ever-increasing unfunded pension liabilities. My home state of Connecticut trails such pension liability behemoths like Illinois and New Jersey, but still ranks high on the danger list. In June 2010 the Connecticut public pension fund had $9.3 billion in assets but its actuaries calculated that the state still needed an additional $21.1 billion to meet all its pension obligations. It was only 44 percent funded.

Why I am running a primary against Rosa DeLauro

I am a Democrat. I believe in progressive values. So, the big question is, why challenge Rosa DeLauro in this year’s Democratic Primary?
The answer is an easy one.
Millennials reading this should take note of this fact: Rosa DeLauro has served longer than you have probably been alive.
We are in a time of transition. I regard this race not so much as an election to challenge an incumbent, but rather as one to offer voters a progressive alternative — one with a proven track record, vision, energy, and fresh ideas.

Trump will be impeached?…Eventually

Last February, I wrote an article stating that Trump would be impeached before the end of 2017.  In retrospect, it seems I was more hopeful then realistic. One reason impeachment did not occur in 2017 and may not occur in 2018 is that the Republicans have control over the House, and the Republicans will not support impeachment no matter what the facts may be.  But don’t panic, unless there is a dramatic shift in the polls and in Mr. Trump’s behavior, the Democrats should take control of the House in November.  There also is a reasonable possibility of taking the Senate, as well.  The shift of just two seats in the Senate will transfer control from the Republicans to the Democrats.

Word of the year: Trumpus

The various “words of the year” as proclaimed by august wordsmiths, such as the Oxford English Dictionary and Merriam-Webster, are woefully inadequate for the 2017 we just suffered through. Youthquake? Please! There’s a fake word, signifying nothing, if I ever saw one. No, the only word of the year for me is Trumpus. It is the first cousin of rumpus. Old timey wise guys used to greet one another with the phrase, “What’s the rumpus?” They wanted to know what the latest uproar was in the underworld, who shot whom, that sort of gangsta gossip.

The Medicare Savings Program rescue plan is fiscally irresponsible

The bill [to rescue the Medicare Savings Program] before the General Assembly on Monday is a far cry from fiscal responsibility. Despite a growing deficit, and a projected deficit for fiscal year 2019, based on the plan expected to be put before the legislature, the General Assembly appears content to avoid making tough decisions about how to deal with the $224 million deficit gorilla in the Capitol and instead has decided to just keep feeding it.