Has Dan Malloy lost his mind?

If there’s a quote I’m tired of hearing, it’s the one groundlessly attributed to Einstein, which defines insanity as doing the same thing over and over while expecting a different result. Of course there’s a reason the saying is so common, at least in Connecticut: a lot of crazy repetition goes on at our state capitol. Take the fiscal policy of the Democratic party since they’ve had total control of state government. 

Employers — White House included — must not tolerate domestic violence

Rob Porter’s resignation as White House staff secretary amid domestic violence allegations from two ex-wives should provide us all moment to pause. Porter has been accused of physically and emotionally abusing his former spouses and a previous girlfriend. Of great concern is the reaction of his employer, The White House. White House support for Porter and questions around the integrity of the domestic violence claims has sent a chilling message to victims across our country. Despite words to the effect that “domestic violence should be taken seriously,” statements issuing from the President and his staff fall incredibly short of acknowledging the gravity of this problem.

A fairer, safer way to elect our presidents

Robert Mueller’s indictments last Friday confirm that even Russian hackers know where to find the people who elect America’s president. “The defendants and their co-conspirators,” says the federal court filing, “learned…that they should focus their activities on ‘purple states like Colorado, Virginia & Florida.’” Under our system, the outcome of the winner-take-all contest in about 40 states is practically preordained when campaigning starts. So Russian election-disrupters — like U.S. presidential candidates — know where to put their resources. And it’s not in Connecticut, where Hilary Clinton became the seventh Democrat in a row to win the state’s electoral votes.

Support a pro-worker agenda for economic growth

Last Wednesday marked the beginning of the 2018 legislative session in Connecticut, and a new opportunity to steer our state in the right direction. To that end, the Connecticut Working Families Organization released its 2018 legislative agenda, a series of concrete and common sense policy recommendations designed to spur economic growth by empowering workers, reducing inequality, and increasing regional competitiveness. For Connecticut’s economy to grow, we need to create the conditions that make success possible for the vast majority of working class families in our state, just as many of our neighboring states have already done.

Connecticut judge not fit for promotion

If public figures with an animus against the Catholic Church were driven out of public life, Connecticut’s Andrew McDonald would not be sitting on the Connecticut Supreme Court today. That he has been nominated by Gov. Dannel Malloy to be Chief Justice makes this story all the more surreal.

Regional governance: Not an option, but a necessity

The issue of regional cooperation, regionalism, regional governance is gradually rising from a faint whisper to an almost audible level of tone in the Land of Steady Habits where the myth of municipal home rule reigns supreme.  I have been involved with issues of regional cooperation for close to 30 years in various capacities. I have observed the concept progressing in symbolic or fragmented ways, a little here, a little there; but not in the systemic ways that can achieve a more dynamic economy, and overcome the many constraints we now experience in our current mode of state/municipal governance

Fairness to workers should come in many forms

The CT Working Families Party fully supports the Gov. Dannel Malloy’s call for a fairer Connecticut. We’re very encouraged by his commitment to put the needs of Connecticut’s workers, who have made so many sacrifices over the years, first. His plan to ensure fairness in the workplace is a welcomed return to the policies he campaigned on and made Connecticut a national leader for other states to follow.

State of the immigrant community far from ‘Connecticut Fairness’

In his annual State of the State address, Gov. Dannel Malloy paints a picture of a “fair Connecticut” that does not currently exist for immigrant youth. On the first day of the 2018 Legislative Session, … he noted that “Connecticut Fairness” means that Connecticut passed the Connecticut Dream Act to ensure equal access to higher education for immigrant students in our state.

Silent Cal, Noisy Donald and the business of America

In 1925, during another era of pronounced income inequality and less than five years before the Great Depression, President Calvin Coolidge addressed this existential question: What is America about? When taken out of context of its accompanying remarks, the bastardized version of his famous quote—“The business of America is business”— does not do our 30th president, or us, justice.

A transportation funding crisis years in the making

Fare hikes, rail service cuts and a freeze on transportation projects.  As he promised in December, Gov. Dannel Malloy announced them all last month.  Rail commuters and highway drivers are justifiably outraged, but they should direct their anger not at the Governor or Connecticut Department of Transportation but at the legislature.

Next steps for Connecticut’s fiscal stability and economic growth

Connecticut is poised for a serious debate over the size and role of its future government as it prepares for a new legislative session in February and a new business-led economic commission due to issue its report on March 1. How should the state view the options during this historic debate? Connecticut has assets most states can only dream about: an enviable location; a highly skilled workforce; world-renowned educational, medical and cultural institutions; a diversified economy; and an attractive quality of life. Yet, we are inundated with a bleak one-dimensional narrative of failure, job loss and stagnation.

Indifference, neutrality help the oppressors, not the oppressed

Indifference manifests itself in ignorance, silence and acceptance. Turning our backs to the injustices suffered by the marginalized, vulnerable, and victimized in our local communities and around the world is a weak and heartless admission that the status quo is just fine with us when it doesn’t affect our lives directly — at least not yet. And that’s a very big “yet” because unchecked turmoil can arrive anytime at our doorsteps regardless of who we think we are.