Why walking with your doctor could be better than talking with your doctor

Gyms across the country will be packed this week with people vowing to “get moving” to lose weight this year. Much of the effort will be for naught. And, in fact, some of it could lead to injury and frustration. Currently, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention exercise guidelines call for all individuals to do 150 to 300 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week, or 75 minutes of high-intensity exercise per week. In addition, the CDC recommends two days of strength training, or muscle strengthening, for obese people.

Why the Laffer Curve is garbage

Legislators and the voting public have consistently been persuaded by a false premise that if we reduce our tax rates on the wealthy and large corporations, our economy will improve. The rationale goes: By decreasing taxes on these two groups, our gross domestic product will increase due to investment in research and development, bolstered business infrastructure, new job opportunities, better pay and improved business climate which welcomes capital. This flawed ideology, touted by Arthur Laffer in his book “The Laffer Curve,” rests on theories that don’t stand up to any level of scrutiny.

GOP candidates should get some legal advice on contracts

At last week’s Republican gubernatorial debate, the various candidates proudly proclaimed how they would each seek to unravel the state’s collectively bargained agreement with the state workforce. Several candidates said they would abolish pensions entirely. At least one candidate – a self-proclaimed “expert” in pension and retirement benefits – has said that he would, as governor, seek to “override” the agreement entirely. In other words, these candidates believe in ignoring the Constitution of the United States of America.

Let’s talk about real issues, not Trump’s mental health

The Connecticut Mirror covered the invitation issued by Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) to a Yale psychiatrist, Bandy X. Lee, to her Washington home to discuss the sitting president’s fitness – or lack thereof – for the office he holds. The first time I saw the story, I scrolled by. The second time, I clicked on the link.  By the third or fourth time, I responded with a short series of tweets expressing my profound disappointment. By the third or fourth time I did this, I was invited to write an op-ed. That was last week. So much has happened in the intervening days, as has seemed to be the case since January 2017, that I, myself, questioned whether it was worth my time to write this, and your time to read it. But here we are.

What Jeff Sessions doesn’t understand about medical marijuana

On Jan. 4, Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded the Cole memo, a 2013 document that limits federal enforcement of marijuana laws. This opens the door for a crackdown in the nine states with legal recreational marijuana. … I have researched a number of drugs of abuse and natural products for safety and effectiveness. Just because a drug has abuse potential doesn’t mean it’s always bad and just because it’s natural doesn’t mean it’s always safe. While I’m no fan of legalizing recreational marijuana use, I believe there has to be special dispensation for patients with a legitimate medical need.

Push for carbon-free and other climate-change legislation

The article published in the Connecticut Mirror on Jan. 18, “Sandy + 5; Irene +6: Coastal resilience still elusive and expensive,” highlighted the need for Connecticut’s coastal towns to develop plans to become more resilient to hurricanes and rising sea level, yet it made no mention of the need to address climate change, the consequences of which include coastal flooding and more extreme weather events.

The state’s pension plans as configured are doomed to fail

States all over the country are grappling with ever-increasing unfunded pension liabilities. My home state of Connecticut trails such pension liability behemoths like Illinois and New Jersey, but still ranks high on the danger list. In June 2010 the Connecticut public pension fund had $9.3 billion in assets but its actuaries calculated that the state still needed an additional $21.1 billion to meet all its pension obligations. It was only 44 percent funded.

President Trump should apologize to the Haitians

Why does President Trump always shoot himself in the foot? His policies of lower taxes and decreased regulation has the economy on a tear and the stock market booming. He has destroyed ISIS, forced NATO to pay its fair share and kept many of his campaign promises.
So why insult African Americans – whose unemployment has plummeted because of his policies – by calling Haiti and Africa a “shithole?”  President Trump should apologize and allow the 58,000 Haitians given temporary legal status after the earthquake to remain in the United States.

Closing Simpson-Waverly School will do more harm than good

The superintendent of Hartford has proposed to close two schools and consolidate others mostly in the poorest and most segregated areas of the city in order to cut cost and avoid costly building renovations. The vote will take place in the next Board of Education meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 16. As professors who worked in the past several years in partnership with Simpson-Waverly Pre-K-8 school, we would like to suggest that such closure will do more harm than good and will be much more costly in the long run for the city of Hartford.

Why I am running a primary against Rosa DeLauro

I am a Democrat. I believe in progressive values. So, the big question is, why challenge Rosa DeLauro in this year’s Democratic Primary?
The answer is an easy one.
Millennials reading this should take note of this fact: Rosa DeLauro has served longer than you have probably been alive.
We are in a time of transition. I regard this race not so much as an election to challenge an incumbent, but rather as one to offer voters a progressive alternative — one with a proven track record, vision, energy, and fresh ideas.