CT students with disabilities need to choose college wisely

The National Council on Disability reported this year that students with disabilities are entering higher education at roughly the same rate as their non-disabled peers. But current research reflects that only 34 percent of students in this demographic are completing a four year degree after eight years. So parents and students need to assure that the institution they are considering understands the law and has the resources available to meet the student’s individual needs. If your college-bound student is one of the estimated 2 million students with a disability, there are some important issues to consider.

Governor, close Southbury, other similar state-run institutions

Connecticut likes to think of itself as a progressive state. Yet when it comes to the civil rights of those with intellectual disabilities, we are not. As Connecticut clings to a discredited institutional approach, many states — including Oklahoma and Tennessee — will observe the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) with none of their citizens isolated in segregated institutions. Sadly, “progressive” Connecticut will not be able to do the same. I call on the governor to close the state’s five such institutions by the year 2020.